X-Training Tips & Techniques Part 2

Working on your x-training and functional fitness is an ongoing and never ending process as we are always developing and evolving.
Here’s a few places to get started.

PRACTICE YOUR DOUBLE UNDERS.

What is a double under you may ask? A double under is skipping while swinging the rope under your feet twice with each skip.
In my very first official CrossFit class, the WOD was made up of a ton of double unders, of which I couldn’t do a single one. Oh, the frustration, the whip marks. Ughhhh. I tried with all my might to get that skipping rope under my feet twice with each skip but it just wasn’t happening. All the while I was tensing up what seemed to be every single muscle in my body, trying way to hard and completely exhausting myself.
We recommend purchasing your own speed rope that’s properly sized for your height, that way you can practice anytime and not have to scramble to find a suitable loaner rope pre-WOD. You don’t have to shell out for a fancy one either. You can get a decent double under rope for around $15, while if you want to doll out a little more, you can spend as much as $50.

Don’t Try Too Much Too Soon

Busting open a shin on a 20-inch box jump doesn’t feel good. Leave your ego at the door and remember that your coach knows best. Start small—like on a 12-inch box—and progress as you grow stronger and feel more comfortable.

Don’t Cheat Yourself

Performing a CrossFit push-up? Lower your chest all the way to the ground. Busting out a CrossFit squat? Get those hips below the knees.”Cutting it short is cheating,” says Loic Rouby. “Trainers set standards to ensure that everyone is completing the same amount of work per rep, and to help each athlete develop more strength and flexibility.” If it feels too tough, adjust your weight or ask the trainer for an acceptable modification. Either way, aim to complete the full range of motion using proper form.

Don’t Lose Count

“It’s important to measure everything so you can follow your progress,” And charting those PRs isn’t just good for social media bragging (although that’s certainly allowed): Many workouts call for lifting a certain percentage of your one rep max (the highest amount of weight you can lift while completing one rep with proper form). So keeping a good log one day can help you push yourself the next.